Our thoughts have prepared us

November 11, 2013 Comments Off on Our thoughts have prepared us

Our thoughts have prepared us for the happiness or unhappiness we
experience.

Bowl of Saki, November 11, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Hazrat Inayat Khan:

In point of fact, whatever one makes of oneself, one becomes that. The
source of happiness or unhappiness is all in man, himself. When he is
unaware of this, he is not able to arrange his life. As he becomes more
acquainted with this secret, he gains mastery. The process by which this
mastery is attained is the only fulfillment of the purpose of this life.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/X/X_3_4.htm

‘The present is the reflection of the past, and the future is the re-echo
of the present.’ Destiny is not what is already made; destiny is what we
are making. Very often fatalists think that we are in the hands of destiny,
driven in whatever direction in life destiny wills; but in point of fact we
are the masters of our destiny, especially from the moment we begin to
realize this fact. … Man is responsible for his success and failure, for
his rise and fall. And it is man who brings these about either knowingly or
unknowingly.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_31.htm

A person thinks, ‘Some day I should like to build a factory.’ At this time
he has no money, no knowledge, no capability; but a thought came, ‘Some day
I should like to build a factory.’ Then he thinks of something else.
Perhaps years pass, but that thought has been working constantly through a
thousand minds, and a thousand sources prepare for him that which he once
desired. If we could look back to all we have thought of at different
times, we would find that the line of fate or destiny, Kismet as it is
called in the East, is formed by our thought. Thoughts have prepared for us
that happiness or unhappiness which we experience. The whole of mysticism
is founded on this.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_17.htm

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The kingdom of heaven

October 1, 2013 Comments Off on The kingdom of heaven

The kingdom of heaven is in the hearts of those who realize God.

Bowl of Saki, September 25, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Hazrat Inayat Khan:

Being born again means that the soul is awakened after having come on
earth, and entering the kingdom of heaven means that this world, the same
kingdom in which we are standing just now, turns into heaven as soon as the
point of view has changed. Is it not interesting and most wonderful to
think that the same earth we walk on is earth to one person and heaven to
another? And it is still more interesting to notice that it is we who
change it; we change it from earth into heaven, or we change it otherwise.
This change comes not by study, nor by anything else, but only by the
changing of our point of view.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIV/XIV_19.htm

The difference between a scientist and a mystic is that the former analyzes
the things he is interested in, studying them by different methods in order
to ascertain as much information about them as he can, the ways in which
they can be of any benefit, their uses, and their nature, whereas the
mystic, though in a way doing the same, first aims at lighting that light
within himself by which he can see in this world of darkness and illusion,
instead of using some technical instrument or special scientific process.
As it is said, ‘Seek ye first the kingdom of heaven’, so his first task is
to light the candle within.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_I_15.htm

The Kingdom of Heaven is in the hearts of those who realize God. This is
recognized in the East, and great respect and regard is always shown for
the holy ones. … Speaking from a metaphysical point of view, the Kingdom
of Heaven may be attained by the way of repentance. If we have offended a
friend, and he turns away from us, and we in fullness of heart ask for
forgiveness, his heart will melt towards us. If, on the other hand, we
close our heart, it becomes frozen. … When by warmth of heart we can
break our limited self, we merge in the One, the unlimited. When our
limited kingdom is lost from our sight, we inherit the Kingdom of God.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_29.htm

The basis of mysticism is to be found in that saying of the Bible, ‘Seek ye
first the kingdom of heaven, and all these things will be added unto you.’
Thus the search of the mystic is for that kingdom, for God, and in that
search what does he find? In the search for God he finds himself.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XI/XI_III_2.htm

It is better to pay than receive

October 1, 2013 Comments Off on It is better to pay than receive

It is better to pay than receive from the vain, for such favors demand ten
times their cost.

Bowl of Saki, September 24, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Hazrat Inayat Khan:

Do not look for thanks or appreciation for all the good you do to others,
nor use it as a means to stimulate your vanity. Do all that you consider
good for the sake of goodness, not even for a return of that from God.

~~~ “Sangatha I, 3 – Saluk”, by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

When one sees clearly the roguery and crookedness of another person and yet
allows him to take the best, he is the holy man, he is beyond the regions
of humanity, he is beginning to climb the angelic planes, he sees all
things, understands all things and tolerates all things. The mystics talk
about the innocence of Jesus, and Sufis try to follow it as an example.
This innocence is the same, and revelation comes to that person who sees
all the falsehood and treachery of human nature and pities instead of
accusing, and forgives because he has reached to that height that no
falsehood, roguery, deceit or treachery of an ordinary human being can
touch him — he is above it.

~~~ “Githa III, Kashf 8, Revelation”, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
(unpublished)

We must give our services and our time to the deserving and undeserving
alike, and we must be thankful to God that He has enabled us to give. For
this is the only opportunity we have of giving. This life is short, and we
shall never have the same opportunity to give, to serve, to do something
for others. … It is said that if a man asks you for your coat, you should
give him your cloak also. Why? Because neither the cloak nor the coat are
yours. If someone thinks, ‘This is mine, I should keep it, I should guard
it’, he will always be watching his goods. If they are yours, whose were
they before? Whose will they be after you? Someone will take them after
you, and all that you value so much will be in the hands of others.

Then it is said that if someone asks you to go with him one mile, you
should go with him two miles. That means, if someone makes use of our
services, let us not think, ‘Why should I, such an important person, serve
another, give my time to another?’ Let us give our services more liberally
than we are asked to do. Let us give service, give our time; but when the
time for receiving comes, do not let us expect to receive anything. … We
must practice virtue because we like it; do good because we like to do it
and not for any return; expect no kindness or appreciation; if we do, it
will become a trade. This is the right way for the world in general, and
the only way of becoming happy.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_12.htm

For whom shall we build a throne of soft cushions? For our own vanity’s
sake, thinking that we are better than others? No, for the pleasure of
others, and not for our vanity. As soon as the question arises, ‘Am I not
better than others, am I not more spiritual or wiser than others?’ then
there is ‘I’. That is wrong. What does it matter what we are as long as we
are able to give pleasure to others, to make life easy for others? For this
is the world of woes … and if we can be of some little use to anybody, we
can more easily learn what mysticism is; for the only real mysticism is
when a person realizes that he pleases God by pleasing mankind.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_40.htm

It is better to pay than receive

September 26, 2013 Comments Off on It is better to pay than receive

It is better to pay than receive from the vain, for such favors demand ten
times their cost.

Bowl of Saki, September 24, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Hazrat Inayat Khan:

Do not look for thanks or appreciation for all the good you do to others,
nor use it as a means to stimulate your vanity. Do all that you consider
good for the sake of goodness, not even for a return of that from God.

~~~ “Sangatha I, 3 – Saluk”, by Hazrat Inayat Khan (unpublished)

When one sees clearly the roguery and crookedness of another person and yet
allows him to take the best, he is the holy man, he is beyond the regions
of humanity, he is beginning to climb the angelic planes, he sees all
things, understands all things and tolerates all things. The mystics talk
about the innocence of Jesus, and Sufis try to follow it as an example.
This innocence is the same, and revelation comes to that person who sees
all the falsehood and treachery of human nature and pities instead of
accusing, and forgives because he has reached to that height that no
falsehood, roguery, deceit or treachery of an ordinary human being can
touch him — he is above it.

   ~~~ “Githa III, Kashf 8, Revelation”, by Hazrat Inayat Khan
(unpublished)

We must give our services and our time to the deserving and undeserving
alike, and we must be thankful to God that He has enabled us to give. For
this is the only opportunity we have of giving. This life is short, and we
shall never have the same opportunity to give, to serve, to do something
for others. … It is said that if a man asks you for your coat, you should
give him your cloak also. Why? Because neither the cloak nor the coat are
yours. If someone thinks, ‘This is mine, I should keep it, I should guard
it’, he will always be watching his goods. If they are yours, whose were
they before? Whose will they be after you? Someone will take them after
you, and all that you value so much will be in the hands of others.

Then it is said that if someone asks you to go with him one mile, you
should go with him two miles. That means, if someone makes use of our
services, let us not think, ‘Why should I, such an important person, serve
another, give my time to another?’ Let us give our services more liberally
than we are asked to do. Let us give service, give our time; but when the
time for receiving comes, do not let us expect to receive anything. … We
must practice virtue because we like it; do good because we like to do it
and not for any return; expect no kindness or appreciation; if we do, it
will become a trade. This is the right way for the world in general, and
the only way of becoming happy.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VI/VI_12.htm

For whom shall we build a throne of soft cushions? For our own vanity’s
sake, thinking that we are better than others? No, for the pleasure of
others, and not for our vanity. As soon as the question arises, ‘Am I not
better than others, am I not more spiritual or wiser than others?’ then
there is ‘I’. That is wrong. What does it matter what we are as long as we
are able to give pleasure to others, to make life easy for others? For this
is the world of woes … and if we can be of some little use to anybody, we
can more easily learn what mysticism is; for the only real mysticism is
when a person realizes that he pleases God by pleasing mankind.

http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_40.htm

 

Temple Metaphysics

July 6, 2013 Comments Off on Temple Metaphysics

Our Supreme God Siva has created the Mahadevas, the Gods, to help us, to protect us, to inspire us–such as Lord Murugan, Lord Ganesha and many others. Ganesha, above all others, is the God, the great Mahadeva, to be invoked before every act and especially worshiped and prayed to when changes occur in our lives as we move from the old established patterns into new ones. Lord Ganesha is always there to steady our minds and open the proper doors as we evolve and progress. He never, ever fails. He is always there for us when we need Him. Lord Murugan was created by God Siva’s shakti and given a vel of spiritual discernment, a lance of divine intelligence. Pray to Lord Murugan to unravel the great mysteries of the universe. Pray to Lord Murugan to make you a spiritual person. Pray to Lord Murugan to release you into the arms of Lord Siva by teaching you more about your Saivite religion.

The understanding of the reality of God and the Gods may help you to appreciate the importance of prayer and worship. Take, for instance, our hymns and chants–our Devarams and bhajanas, our japa and the many other ways we express the praises and love of God Siva that we feel in our hearts. These hymns are actually heard by the subtle beings. Devas in the Second World come, hover around and near us and rejoice in our singing. If we are deeply devoted and inspired, then even the Mahadevas of the Third World will hover above the devas in their magnificent bodies of light, showering blessings to those who are singing or chanting prayerfully.

You may not be able to see these subtle beings, but you can feel their presence, feel a holy atmosphere around you. I’m sure that many of you here have felt this, perhaps while chanting Aum Namah Sivaya. As long as somebody is saying “Aum Namah Sivaya,” the Saivite religion exists on the planet in full force. Wake up in the morning saying “Aum Namah Sivaya, Aum Namah Sivaya.” Go to sleep at night saying “Aum Namah Sivaya, Aum Namah Sivaya,” and through the night you will leave your physical body and travel in the celestial spheres, where we are all together, learning, meditating and advancing ourselves spiritually.

On this Earth plane the Gods have a special home, and that is the holy temple. It is in the sanctified temple, where regular and proper puja is being performed in a pure way, that the Gods most easily manifest. You can go to a Hindu temple with your mind filled up with worries, you can be in a state of jealousy and anger, and leave the temple wondering what you were disturbed about, completely free from the mental burdens and feeling secure. So great are the divine psychiatrists, the Gods of our religion, who live in the Third World, who come from the Third World to this world where our priests perform the pujas and invoke their presence over the stone image.

Hindus do not worship stone images. Don’t let anyone ever convince you of that. It is absolutely false. Those who say such things simply do not understand the mystical workings of the temple, or they seek to ridicule our religion because they feel insecure about their own. Hindu priests invoke the Gods to come and manifest for a few minutes within the sanctum of the temple. The Deities do come in their subtle bodies of light. They hover in and above the stone image and bless the people. If you are psychic and your third eye is open, you can see the God there and have His personal darshana. Many of our ancient Saivite saints, as well as contemporary devotees, have seen such visions of the Gods. They know from personal experience that God and the Gods do exist.

When we go to the temple, we leave with our mind filled with the shakti of the Deity. We are filled and thrilled with the shakti of the temple in every nerve current of our body. When we return to our home, we light an oil lamp, and that brings the power of the temple into the home. This simple act brings the devas in the Second World right into your home, where they can bless the rest of the family who perhaps did not go to the temple. With a little bit of study of the mysticism of Saivism, we can easily understand how the unseen worlds operate in and through us.
(Lesson 312 from Living with Siva , from Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami)

The fire of devotion purifies

July 3, 2013 Comments Off on The fire of devotion purifies

The fire of devotion purifies the heart of the devotee and leads to spiritual freedom.

Bowl of Saki, June 17, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Overlooking the faults of others with politeness, tolerance, forgiveness, and resignation is regarded as a moral virtue in the East. Man’s heart is visualized as the shrine of God, and even a small injury in thought, word, and deed against it is considered as a great sin against God, the Indwelling One. Gratitude is shown by the loyalty of the Orient and by being true to the salt; the hospitality of a day is remembered throughout all the years of life, while the benefactor never forgets humility even in the midst of his good deeds. There is an Eastern saying, ‘Forget thy virtues and remember thy sins.’

‘Chained with gold chains about the feet of God.’ – Tennyson

Thus the heart, developed by religion and morality, becomes first capable of choosing and then of retaining the object of devotion without wavering for a moment. Yet in the absence of these qualities it remains incapable of either choice or retention.

There have been innumerable devotees in the East, Bhakta or Ashiq, whose devotional powers are absolutely indescribable and ineffable. To the ignorant the story of their lives may appear exaggerated, but the joy of self-negation is greater than that of either spiritual or material joy.

Devotion sweetens the personality, and is the light on the path of the disciple. Those who study mysticism and philosophy while omitting self-sacrifice and resignation grow egoistic and self-centered. Such persons are apt to call themselves either God or a part of God, and thus make an excuse for committing any sins they like. Regardless of sin or virtue they misuse and malign others, being utterly fearless of the hereafter. Yet they forget that ‘strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life’, as the Bible says.

The fire of devotion purifies the heart of the devotee and leads to spiritual freedom. Mysticism without devotion is like uncooked food and can never be assimilated. ‘I am the heart of my devotees,’ says Krishna in the Bhagavad-Gita. And Hafiz says, ‘O joyous day when I depart from this abode of desolation, seeking the repose of my soul and setting out in search of my Beloved.’

from http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_II_8.htm

 

 

The fire of devotion purifies

June 17, 2013 Comments Off on The fire of devotion purifies

The fire of devotion purifies the heart of the devotee and leads to spiritual freedom.

Bowl of Saki, June 17, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Overlooking the faults of others with politeness, tolerance, forgiveness, and resignation is regarded as a moral virtue in the East. Man’s heart is visualized as the shrine of God, and even a small injury in thought, word, and deed against it is considered as a great sin against God, the Indwelling One. Gratitude is shown by the loyalty of the Orient and by being true to the salt; the hospitality of a day is remembered throughout all the years of life, while the benefactor never forgets humility even in the midst of his good deeds. There is an Eastern saying, ‘Forget thy virtues and remember thy sins.’

‘Chained with gold chains about the feet of God.’ – Tennyson

Thus the heart, developed by religion and morality, becomes first capable of choosing and then of retaining the object of devotion without wavering for a moment. Yet in the absence of these qualities it remains incapable of either choice or retention.

There have been innumerable devotees in the East, Bhakta or Ashiq, whose devotional powers are absolutely indescribable and ineffable. To the ignorant the story of their lives may appear exaggerated, but the joy of self-negation is greater than that of either spiritual or material joy.

Devotion sweetens the personality, and is the light on the path of the disciple. Those who study mysticism and philosophy while omitting self-sacrifice and resignation grow egoistic and self-centered. Such persons are apt to call themselves either God or a part of God, and thus make an excuse for committing any sins they like. Regardless of sin or virtue they misuse and malign others, being utterly fearless of the hereafter. Yet they forget that ‘strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life’, as the Bible says.

The fire of devotion purifies the heart of the devotee and leads to spiritual freedom. Mysticism without devotion is like uncooked food and can never be assimilated. ‘I am the heart of my devotees,’ says Krishna in the Bhagavad-Gita. And Hafiz says, ‘O joyous day when I depart from this abode of desolation, seeking the repose of my soul and setting out in search of my Beloved.’

from http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XII/XII_II_8.htm

 

 

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