Every purpose has a birth and death

July 28, 2013 Comments Off on Every purpose has a birth and death

Every purpose has a birth and death; therefore, God is beyond purpose.

Bowl of Saki, July 26, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Then again it may be said, there is a purpose above each purpose, and there is again a purpose under each purpose; and yet beyond and beneath all purposes there is no purpose.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/I/I_I_2.htm

That which we call composition and decomposition and construction and destruction of things, all those are due to change, one thing turning into another. There is no such thing as death or real decomposition or destruction. It may be destruction of that particular object, but although that part which appeared in certain form or color has changed, it is not the true elements of the thing which have changed. Therefore birth and death, composing and decomposing form the constant changes in the appearance of things of life.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/archives/constancy.htm

The difference between the life known to the generality and the life which is unknown is that of illusion and reality. Man mocks at the idea if he be told that all this is illusion, until he dives deep and finds out by comparison that this life which is subject to birth and death and subject to changes is a life and yet no life. This life is like a bubble in the sea. The bubble is existent and yet in reality non-existent when compared with the sea. And yet we cannot say that the bubble is non-existent, for it merges in the same sea in which it once appeared; so nothing takes it away but its own source and its original being.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_21.htm

There is only one being, God, who is above birth and death; all else is subject to the law of birth and death.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/V/V_13.htm

Every passion, every emotion

April 30, 2013 Comments Off on Every passion, every emotion

Every passion, every emotion has its effect upon the mind, and every change of mind, however slight, has its effect upon man’s body.

Bowl of Saki, April 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Different conditions and the changes that take place in the world have their effect upon the mind, and the different conditions of the mind have their effect upon the body. As bodily illness makes man irritable, confused and exhausted in mind, so different conditions of the mind cause health or illness in the body. The link between the body and the mind is the breath, a link through which the influences of the body and the mind are exchanged and work upon one another.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_11.htm

Every passion, every emotion has its effect upon the mind; and every change of mind, however slight, has its effect upon a man’s body… One man is perhaps striving all day to earn his own bread so that he may live in a comfortable manner. Another is always worrying about how to maintain himself and his children. Another is thinking, ‘What can I do to save my fellow man from his trouble?’ If we compare these people, in order to see who is the greatest, we see that he is greatest whose ideal is greatest.

When we consider that great heroes of the past and present, those whom we admire and to whom we look with hope for right guidance, we shall find that what has made them great has been the greatness of their ideal. The lower the ideal, the less the efforts. The higher the ideal, the greater the life. If we use all our intelligence and strength and wisdom to accomplish some little thing, it is only a waste of life. To consider what great things one can accomplish, to seek to do those things which will be most useful and valuable to others, that is the ideal life. … Come to the mystic, then, and sit with him when you are tired of all these other remedies that you have employed in vain; come and take a glass of wine with him. The mystic wine is the inner absorption, which removes all the worries and anxieties and troubles and cares of the physical and mental plane. All these are now done away with forever. It is the mystic who is at rest. It is he who experiences that happiness which others do not experience. It is he who teaches the way to attain that peace and happiness which are the original heritage of man’s soul.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_13.htm

Every passion, every emotion

April 28, 2012 Comments Off on Every passion, every emotion

Every passion, every emotion has its effect upon the mind, and every change of mind, however slight, has its effect upon man’s body.

Bowl of Saki, April 28, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

Different conditions and the changes that take place in the world have their effect upon the mind, and the different conditions of the mind have their effect upon the body. As bodily illness makes man irritable, confused and exhausted in mind, so different conditions of the mind cause health or illness in the body. The link between the body and the mind is the breath, a link through which the influences of the body and the mind are exchanged and work upon one another.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/XIII/XIII_11.htm

Every passion, every emotion has its effect upon the mind; and every change of mind, however slight, has its effect upon a man’s body… One man is perhaps striving all day to earn his own bread so that he may live in a comfortable manner. Another is always worrying about how to maintain himself and his children. Another is thinking, ‘What can I do to save my fellow man from his trouble?’ If we compare these people, in order to see who is the greatest, we see that he is greatest whose ideal is greatest.

When we consider that great heroes of the past and present, those whom we admire and to whom we look with hope for right guidance, we shall find that what has made them great has been the greatness of their ideal. The lower the ideal, the less the efforts. The higher the ideal, the greater the life. If we use all our intelligence and strength and wisdom to accomplish some little thing, it is only a waste of life. To consider what great things one can accomplish, to seek to do those things which will be most useful and valuable to others, that is the ideal life. … Come to the mystic, then, and sit with him when you are tired of all these other remedies that you have employed in vain; come and take a glass of wine with him. The mystic wine is the inner absorption, which removes all the worries and anxieties and troubles and cares of the physical and mental plane. All these are now done away with forever. It is the mystic who is at rest. It is he who experiences that happiness which others do not experience. It is he who teaches the way to attain that peace and happiness which are the original heritage of man’s soul.

from  http://wahiduddin.net/mv2/VII/VII_13.htm

Freedom from Occupation

March 26, 2012 Comments Off on Freedom from Occupation

Can the mind be free from the past, free from thought- not from the good or bad thought? How do I find out? I can only find out by seeing what the mind is occupied with. If my mind is occupied with the good or occupied with the bad, then it is only concerned with the past, it is occupied with the past. It is not free of the past. So, what is important is to find out how the mind is occupied. If it is occupied at all, it is always occupied with the past because all our consciousness is the past. The past is not only on the surface but on the highest level, and the stress on the unconscious is also the past.
Can the mind be free from occupation? This means, can the mind be completely without being occupied and let memory, the thoughts good and bad, go by without choosing? The moment the mind is occupied with one thought, good or bad, then it is concerned with the past. If you really listen – not just merely verbally, but really profoundly – then you will see that there is stability that is not of the mind, which is the freedom from the past.
Yet, the past can never be put aside. There is a watching of the past as it goes by, but not occupation with the past. So the mind is free to observe and not to choose. Where there is choice in this movement of the river of memory, there is occupation; and the moment the mind is occupied, it is caught in the past; and when the mind is occupied with the past, it is incapable of seeing something real, true, new, original, uncontaminated.

– J. Krishnamurti, The Book of Life

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