Dropping Ideals

November 7, 2013 Comments Off on Dropping Ideals

Osho,
Can  cowardice and hypocrisy also be beautiful?

If you have the idea to be a brave man then it looks ugly to be a coward. But cowardice is a fact, and the ideal is just an ideal, a fantasy of the mind.

Sacrifice fantasies to reality, drop all ideals, and then life starts becoming integrated. All the rejected fragments start coming back home, the repressed starts surfacing. For the first time you start feeling a kind of togetherness; you are no longer falling apart.

For example, if I hold myself to be a “kind” person, I will not be able to permit myself to recognize and accept angry feelings when they arise in consciousness, because kind people just don’t get angry.

Therefore, to bring about a personal unity in consciousness, I must first take my stand as being no thing fixed or enduring, but hold myself to be only the moment-to-moment experiential reality that arises in consciousness.

Thus some moments I am angry, then some moments I am sad, then some moments I am jealous, then some moments I am joyful. Moment-to-moment, whatsoever happens is accepted. Then you become one. And this oneness is the most fundamental thing to understand.

The master must help the disciple to confront and integrate with those rejected experiential aspects of self which he actually is at any given moment instead of trying to help him actualize its compensatory opposite or what the disciple feels that he ought to be, or that which he is trying to protect, enhance or affirm about himself.

My purpose, my function, is to take all ideals away from you. You have come with ideals; you would like me to enhance your ideals, you would like me to support you and help you to become that which you want to become. That may be your motivation in coming here, but that is not my work.

My work is just the opposite: to help you to accept that which is already the case and to forget all about your fantasies. I want you to become more realistic and pragmatic. I want to give you roots in the earth, and you are hankering for the sky and you have completely forgotten the earth.

Yes, the sky is also available, but only to those whose roots have gone deep into the earth. If a tree wants to rise high in the sky and whisper with the clouds and play with the winds and have some communion with the stars, then the tree will have to send deeper and deeper roots into the earth. The first thing is sending roots into the earth, the second thing happens of its own accord. The deeper the roots go, the higher the tree goes; there is no need to do anything else.

My effort here is to send your roots deep into the soil of truth. And the truth is that which you are.

Then suddenly things will start happening: you will start rising. The ideals that you have always tried for and have never been able to achieve will start happening of their own accord.

If a person can accept his reality as it is, in that very acceptance all tension disappears. Anguish, anxiety, despair – they all simply evaporate. And when there is no anxiety, no tension, no fragmentariness, no division, no schizophrenia then suddenly there is joy, then suddenly there is love, then suddenly there is compassion. These are not ideals, these are very natural phenomena. All that is needed is to remove the ideals, because those ideals are functioning as blocks. The more idealistic a person is, the more blocked he is.

As peculiar and contradictory as it may sound, peace is to be found only in the midst of pain and never by struggling against or running away from what is considered to be the negative or painful.

Yes, cowardice gives you pain, fear gives you pain, anger gives you pain – these are negative emotions. But peace can be attained only by accepting and absorbing the painful, not by rejecting it. By rejecting it you will become smaller and smaller and smaller, and you will have less and less power. And you will be in a constant inner war, a civil war, in which one hand will fight with the other, in which you will simply dissipate your energy.

A very fundamental thing to be remembered: only communion with psychological pain opens the door for its liberation and transcendence – only communion with psychological pain.

All that is painful has to be accepted; a dialogue has to be created with it. It is you.

There is no other way to go beyond it, the only way is to absorb it.

And it has tremendous potential. Anger is energy, fear is energy, so is cowardice. All that happens to you has great momentum, a great quantity of energy hidden in it. Once you accept it, that energy becomes yours. You become stronger, you become wider, you start becoming more spacious. You have a bigger inner world then.

Osho, Unio Mystica, Vol. 1, Talk #8
Copyright © 2013 Osho International Foundation

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Vedanta, the Mountain Peak

June 9, 2013 Comments Off on Vedanta, the Mountain Peak

As we progress on the spiritual path, we must have a clear
intellectual understanding of the map leading to the eventual destination, as
well as what is required to prepare ourselves and to take with us to complete
the journey. To begin, we shall discuss Vedanta and Siddhanta,
monism-pluralism, advaita-dvaita and the traditional part that yoga plays
within the midst of Hindu Dharma.
Vedanta is a philosophy and an ideal. It sets its sights on
the mountain peaks and declares emphatically these heights as man’s true abode.
Life as we normally live it, says Vedanta, is based on ignorance of our true
nature. We are like pedigreed animals wallowing in the mud, believing we are
swine, divine beings thinking ourselves to be mere humans. But once we
recognize our true nature, we will rise up from the mud and leave behind,
forever, our previous ignorant ways. Vedanta does not budge from its vision. It
sees no excuse for the nonattainment of its ideals. No human weaknesses are
recognized as reasons for falling short of the goal. They are but challenges.
Vedanta sees all men as equal. It makes the same declaration
of truth to all men, regardless of their varying capabilities. Vedanta tells
the instinctive man, the intellectual, the spiritual man, the man at the gallows
and the man speaking from the pulpit each the same message–that he himself is
the Truth that all men seek, that this world of experience and the role he is
playing in it are based on ignorance of his true nature, that he is himself
God, the Absolute.
Vedanta is the word of sages who have spoken out their
realized truths, not based on needs of individual disciples or attached to a
practical means of reaching followers. Vedanta is simply the goal, the final
truths that man can attain to. The lofty Himalayan peak rises far above the
surrounding country, breaking through the clouds, standing alone in silent
declaration of its majesty. We may see this peak from a distant valley. We may
know and learn much about it. Perhaps we even desire to reach this peak ourselves.
Yet it remains so distant, giving us no clue of the path which could lead us to
it. This is Advaita Vedanta in its purity–a mountain peak truly majestic, but
so far aloft that for most it can only serve to inspire awe and deference
toward heights that are out of our reach.
Vedanta, as an ideal and philosophy, can and perhaps should
leave us just where it does, with a vision, a grand vision, a grand vision of
our potential, but a vision without a practical means of reaching it. The
practical means, the carefully thought out and guided approach, belongs to
another field of experience. And this we would call religion. It is the duty
and purpose of religion to recognize the lofty goal, recognize the realistic
capabilities, potential and present state of those seeking the goal, and
provide a sensible and safe path toward that goal–a path that can take the
strong to the final heights and yet not leave the weak on treacherous
precipices along the way. Religion is the path, the only true path.
Lesson 302 from Living
with Siva: from Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami’s trilogy: Dancing with Siva,
Living with Siva and Merging with Siva;
3,000 page trilogy on Hindu philosophy, culture and metaphysics, available in
the full-color volumes of Dancing, Living and Merging with Siva at our Minimela
online store. Kauai’s Hindu Monastery; Himalayan Academy.com

 

Beautiful Mind

June 8, 2013 Comments Off on Beautiful Mind

We are mesmerised by the outer world, the great drama of life. Seldom do we spend time to think about the glory and the potential of the mind, of the universe within.
We tend to think first of the downside. The mind is passionate, prejudicial, fearful and jealous. Maybe it’s hereditary entrapment. Rarely does one try to find out: Is it the outer world and its allure that i have to enjoy and rejoice in, or is there something even more wonderful in the inner world?
Take a fresh look, cultivate a new outlook. The mind is a wide panorama; it’s expanse is infinite, as is its power. Don’t get bound by negative thoughts. Understand that the mind is capable of spinning and weaving enormous confidence, creating incalculable loftiness, impenetrable depth and immense magnitude. When you start dwelling upon these positive, pleasant and benevolent features of the mind, your fear about the negative will disappear.
The beauty of your face you cannot always see. If you want to see your face, you will have to carry a mirror right in front and that means you won’t be able to do any other work; you can’t even walk.
Only the beauty of the mind becomes experiential and enjoyable. You are fortunate that you have a beautiful mind. Start unfolding the possibilities. Imagine your potential once you know how to master your mind.
If I grant you an empire, and say: “Now, you are the monarch”, will you not jump at the offer and sit on the throne? In the same way, try to think of the empire of the Self. Sit on the throne. Feel the potential. Make the shift from negativism to positivism, from self-condemnation to self-elevation.
Start thinking about the beautiful, pleasant and expansive nature of mind. – by: Swami Bhoomananda Tirtha [Published in the ‘Speaking Tree’ column of The Times of India, 1 Apr 2009]
http://www.brahmavidya.org

Vedanta, the Mountain Peak

June 8, 2013 Comments Off on Vedanta, the Mountain Peak

As we progress on the spiritual path, we must have a clear
intellectual understanding of the map leading to the eventual destination, as
well as what is required to prepare ourselves and to take with us to complete
the journey. To begin, we shall discuss Vedanta and Siddhanta,
monism-pluralism, advaita-dvaita and the traditional part that yoga plays
within the midst of Hindu Dharma.
Vedanta is a philosophy and an ideal. It sets its sights on
the mountain peaks and declares emphatically these heights as man’s true abode.
Life as we normally live it, says Vedanta, is based on ignorance of our true
nature. We are like pedigreed animals wallowing in the mud, believing we are
swine, divine beings thinking ourselves to be mere humans. But once we
recognize our true nature, we will rise up from the mud and leave behind,
forever, our previous ignorant ways. Vedanta does not budge from its vision. It
sees no excuse for the nonattainment of its ideals. No human weaknesses are
recognized as reasons for falling short of the goal. They are but challenges.
Vedanta sees all men as equal. It makes the same declaration
of truth to all men, regardless of their varying capabilities. Vedanta tells
the instinctive man, the intellectual, the spiritual man, the man at the gallows
and the man speaking from the pulpit each the same message–that he himself is
the Truth that all men seek, that this world of experience and the role he is
playing in it are based on ignorance of his true nature, that he is himself
God, the Absolute.
Vedanta is the word of sages who have spoken out their
realized truths, not based on needs of individual disciples or attached to a
practical means of reaching followers. Vedanta is simply the goal, the final
truths that man can attain to. The lofty Himalayan peak rises far above the
surrounding country, breaking through the clouds, standing alone in silent
declaration of its majesty. We may see this peak from a distant valley. We may
know and learn much about it. Perhaps we even desire to reach this peak ourselves.
Yet it remains so distant, giving us no clue of the path which could lead us to
it. This is Advaita Vedanta in its purity–a mountain peak truly majestic, but
so far aloft that for most it can only serve to inspire awe and deference
toward heights that are out of our reach.
Vedanta, as an ideal and philosophy, can and perhaps should
leave us just where it does, with a vision, a grand vision, a grand vision of
our potential, but a vision without a practical means of reaching it. The
practical means, the carefully thought out and guided approach, belongs to
another field of experience. And this we would call religion. It is the duty
and purpose of religion to recognize the lofty goal, recognize the realistic
capabilities, potential and present state of those seeking the goal, and
provide a sensible and safe path toward that goal–a path that can take the
strong to the final heights and yet not leave the weak on treacherous
precipices along the way. Religion is the path, the only true path.
Lesson 302 from Living with Siva : from Satguru Sivaya
Subramuniyaswami’s trilogy: Dancing with Siva, Living with Siva and Merging
with Siva; 3,000 page trilogy on Hindu philosophy,
culture and metaphysics, available in the full-color volumes
of Dancing, Living and Merging with Siva
at our Minimela online store.Kauai’s Hindu Monastery;
Himalayan Academy.com

 

Fruition of Spiritual Pursuit

April 23, 2013 Comments Off on Fruition of Spiritual Pursuit

Harih Om Tat Sat. Jai Guru. Spirituality or spiritual pursuit always deals with your own personality. You are to set right the disharmonies and constrictions of your mind and intelligence. When these constrictions are removed, automatically the mind will become very facile and effective. Of course, during saadhana, a number of good and benevolent qualities should also be cultivated. Because many people may not know about them, our scriptures have extolled these great good qualities. By incorporating these virtues your mind becomes more enriched and expansive.

By spiritual practice, you must be able to absorb and assimilate any input from the world, and at the same time, generate timely response to deal with whatever difficult situations and impacts you face. In other words, when you interact with persons, places and events, you must not get intimidated or affected by them, on the one hand; and on the other, you must have the necessary resolve, impetus, inspiration and determination to go ahead with your interactions, in spite of the challenges and persecutions involved. If these two aspects are ensured and accomplished, I don’t think you require anything else in your life.

Spirituality facilitates this two-fold accomplishment. How does it do that?

First of all, understand that your personality is biological only in the bodily level. The moment you enter and touch the mind, intelligence and ego level, your personality is beyond matter and energy.

The mind, intelligence and ego revolve around what we generally call the ‘Self’ or the ‘Soul’. I would like to put it this way: The body is at the gross level. Inside the gross body, employing the body is the mind. Still inward and superior is the intelligence. Still more so is the ego. Go beyond the ego and reach the Soul.

At the Soul level you will find that you have got a ‘zero’ nature. There, no action or vibration ever takes place. No effect or affectation ever befalls there! It is a level into which none of the bodily, intelligential or egoistic effects reach. In the same manner, no action takes place in that level. We call it as ‘akartritva’ and ‘abhoktritva’ – a state of non-doership and non-enjoyership.

Understand that such a level is there within you. It is already there. You do not have to acquire it. That is why, in spite of the gravest misfortunes and the greatest calamities and impacts, victims are able to go to sleep. When you recover from all the troubles and anxieties, it is your mind that recovers. And it does so only because of the Soul.

At the same time, the Soul is infinitely potent. All egoistic, intelligential, mental and physical activities are possible only in Its presence. Understand that this Soul has a zero factor, and at the same time it is Infinite too! Whenever you want, you must be able to resort to its zeroaspect or tap its infinite dimension. So, never become panicky. Do not be deluded thinking that to rescue you, some help should come from outside.

Another phase of your saadhana is about your reliance on the Supreme. Religion advocates that God is always supreme, and you should rely upon Him.

But understand that the reliance belongs to you, to your mind. Once you have that reliance, you need not even look to God. Then what should you do? Look to your own mind and make its reliance stronger. It is not God that matters here, but your own mind’s quality of reliance. Make the mind see God in every thing. Let every object, every incident, every development and every accident become Godly.

Your saadhana now becomes three-fold. Seeing God in everything, relying upon God for everything, and recognizing the existence of the Soul, which has the zero-factor as well as the infinite potential. If you club these three, then there is nothing more that you require. This is the summum bonum of the entire spiritual pursuit. This is the climax of all devotional, religious, philosophical or yogic pursuits. This will answer all your needs and will provide you all the impetus and enthusiasm to lead a glorious life.  – Swami Bhoomananda Tirtha
[This is a Prabhata-rashmih message from Poojya Swamiji, which was published in the Dec 2010 issue of the monthly Journal Vicharasethu.] (c) Narayanashrama Tapovanam, 2012

Worship through Interactions

April 12, 2013 Comments Off on Worship through Interactions

In Yoga-vaasishtha Ramayanam, Lord Siva says (6p.39.38,39,41):

Worship the inner, gentle, amiable Soul even by all kinds of quarrel, taste, tendencies, etc., and also by expression of desire and hatred.

Propitiate the Soul seated in your heart by sweet friendship and intimacy, lofty like that radiating from the heart of the noble, and cool like the moon.

Worship the Soul within, through whatever comes providentially, by enjoyment or by its absence.

The test and fruition of spiritual wisdom is the skill and mastery it bestows in treating life in its fullness, excluding no event, process or outcome any time. This all-fold welcome and sublimation is what makes a spiritual Knower’s life distinct from those of the others. None can escape the influence of the pairs of opposites surrounding every walk of life. Here Lord Siva says, the seeker should take every interaction with an open, spiritually enlightened mind, embracing and assimilating it outright – be it quarrel, conflict, disparity or disagreeable trait in others, may be at home or outside.

Unlike the sun, the moon goes on waxing and waning. So too our life may shrink or swell, in the midst of dvandvas encircling us. One day will be good, favourable and pleasant, but another not so. Do not let these make you feel high or low. As the world hosts these, your mind too has to. By so doing, the sense and degree of sublimation and enrichment will grow. In enjoyment or suffering, affluence or penury, acclaim or disdain, be evenly disposed.

Mind has the potential to do this, and this evenness, when done well, will bring immeasurable inner enrichment. This is the singular quality that makes the seeker and Knower excel and exult.

See how Lord Siva transits from the ambit of ceremonial worship to the domain of inner refinement, enrichment and sublimation. In fact, all religious and philosophical pursuits have the sole aim of dealing with the mind’s vagaries and self-denigrating habits, to get steeped in inner fullness and unshakability.  – Swami Bhoomananda Tirtha
[This is an extract from the Series titled ‘Science of Inner Redemption’, based on Yogavaasishtha Ramayana. This particular piece is from Jun 2011 issue of the monthly journal, “Vicharasethu – The Path of Introspection”.]
(c) Narayanashrama Tapovanam, 2012
Venginissery, P.O. Ammadam, Trichur, Kerala – 680 563
http://www.SwamiBhoomanandaTirtha.org

Carry on Daily Activities without Desire

July 16, 2012 Comments Off on Carry on Daily Activities without Desire

 

A question was put forward:

Any kind of desire causes impurity. How do we carry on the daily activities without desire and the accompanying impurity?

Swami Bhoomananda Thirtha speaks:

Any kind of desire causes disturbance and it is also impure. Think on the basis: “I am the Self and the Self is blissful. Blissful as I am, I don’t have to seek any further blissfulness. So, any kind of desire to add anything, is intrinsically wrong and it is contradictory to the concept of the blissful Self that I am.” Can you not think in these lines? The entire idea of desire should be replaced by another factor – that of yajna. In Bhagavadgeeta (3rd Chapter) you will find Krishna’s statements to this effect.

We are all living in this world. Our birth is not a result of our desire. It has taken place. We are not going to die either, because of our desire. As we grow, small desires start cropping up in our mind and these become bigger and deeper as the age advances. Life itself is the duration between an undesired birth and undesired death. In between these two, why should desire intervene at all?

Other than desire, there are sufficient motivational and compulsive factors, which keep us active. You get up early in the morning. Is it because of a desire? Once you have gone to sleep, your egoism, will and wish – all are wiped off. Then how is it that you get up? It is not because of desire.

Nature makes you get up. Nature has provided three mental states for us – wakefulness, sleep and dream. We don’t know when we get into a dream or when exactly we fall asleep. We automatically wake up. Then only we know that we had slept.

On waking up, we become active. An activity is primarily mental, oral or physical. If the mind does not think at all, can anybody be active? What is the power that makes the mind think? It is Nature. It is the same power, that manifests in the oral and physical activities.

The mind thinks. It remembers the past, plans for the future, and is equally concerned about the present. Linking up the past, present and future, is an automatic job of the mind, like blood circulation. In this also there is no question of desire. Why don’t you recognise that it is so and allow the activity as a part of your life process, not thinking that it is an outcome of any particular desire?

When a child is born, parents start bringing him or her up. The child’s body grows and he or she is admitted to the school. A period of education is completed and the individual gains certain merit. This merit is required by the society. Depending upon the society’s requirements, people of different merits are sought and employed. Is it not thus the society and nature that carry us through? Where is desire coming in this natural sequence?

 

Suppose a person with no merit, desires to be employed and get a fat salary. Will it ever take place? On the other hand, if there is a person who has certain merit, the world will look for him – even hunt for him – for doing a particular job or mission, which one like him alone can fulfil, whether he desires or not.

So, it is not desire that makes us work. It is merit. It is potential, capacity. To desire is foolish; it is mere ignorance; it is a sheer delusion. Without any desire, you can still work. Is activity a result of desire or desire a result of activity? Whatever potential or capacity we have, let us display it, without desire.

Look, it is not human beings alone that live in this world. Animals and birds far outnumber the humans. We have trees, plants and creepers. They have also lived in this world as long as we have lived. Do they desire? Are they not perpetuating their races? Is not each species continuing to live? Without desire, all the nonhumans are living comfortably. We alone with desire make our life uncomfortable, miserable!

There is a great lesson for us. I would like all of you to take up the subject of desire and go to the very root of it until you understand the whole process fundamentally. Is desire the motivation in the human or it is one’s own potential that displays from time to time? – Swami Bhoomananda Tirtha

[This is an extract from a question-answer session published in Mar 2007 issue of Vicharasetu]

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